Category Archives: Education

“Humanity” by Afro-Brazilian Writer & Poet Carolina Maria de Jesus – By Rosaliene Bacchus

Three Worlds One Vision

Carolina Maria de Jesus - Favela of Caninde - Sao Paulo - Before publication of first book

Carolina Maria de Jesus with cart – Favela of Canindé – São Paulo (circa 1958)
Photo Credit: Jornal Estado de Minas (Collection Audálio Dantas)

My Poetry Corner November 2018 features the poem “Humanity” (Humanidade) by Afro-Brazilian writer and poet, Carolina Maria de Jesus (1914-1977), born in a rural community in Minas Gerais, Southeast Brazil.

An illegitimate child of a sharecropping family, Carolina was treated as an outcast. After just two years in primary school, when she learned to read and write, she developed a love for reading. She dreamed of becoming a writer.

“The book…fascinates me,” de Jesus writes in My Strange Diary (Meu Estranho Diário). “I was raised in the world. Without maternal guidance. But books guided my thinking. Avoiding the abysses that we encounter in life. Blessed the time I spent reading. I came to the conclusion that it’s the poor who must read. Because…

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Guyana: There are jobs but the takers are few – By ADAM HARRIS

Guyana was once a country of carpenters, masons and other artisans. These people were in such number that the Caribbean countries reached out to them for their skills. Barbados, in particular, attracted numerous skilled Guyanese, to the extent that when the Barbados government clamped down on illegal Guyanese, their construction sector suffered.

To a man, Barbados acknowledged that Guyanese were among the most skilled in the region. I suspect that there has been a relaxation of the clampdown, because I am not hearing too many complaints from the Barbados construction sector.

However, this past week, there was the announcement that Guyana is desperately short of these very skilled artisans. Imagine, from the days when carpenters were a dime a dozen and masons could be found at every corner, Guyana is now complaining.      Continue reading

CANGO – Canada-Guyana Outreach Mission to Guyana – Report for October 20. 2018

October 20 at 9:45 AM  –  REPORT

This Report has been prepared by CANGO

Well….we have arrived in Charity after an awesome early morning ride on the ferry. Weather is a bit overcast with some rain showers, but it is still HOT..lol.

We are now waiting for our boat to take us on to Moruca. Essequibo. Guyana.

READ MORE + PHOTOS

CANGO – Canada-Guyana Outreach Mission to Guyana – Report for October 19. 2018

October 19 at 10:24 PMThis Report has been prepared by CANGO

Yvonne, Cyril and Judy – part of the organizing team, have arrived safely in Guyana. Thanks to Roxanne Reece, Lawrence Kanhai, Anna French, Nadine Hing and the staff and crew at Fly Jamaica for helping us transport the wheelchairs, IV pole and numerous bags for the mission. We had a small glitch with customs when we arrived in Guyana, but eventually everything sorted itself out and after a few hours were transported to Georgetown accompanied by Delroy from the Ministry of P

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UG- University of Guyana Alumni -Toronto – Meet and Greet – November 25. 2018

Guyana Memories: “I’ll always Remember” and “I’ll never Forget” – by Francis Quamina Farrier

Dave Martins with Farrier

Like so many Guyanese and many other nationals around the world, I am a Dave Martins fan. I love his music with that rich bouncy Caribbean beat. I love his lyrics, always with something to learn and think about. And during the past decade or so, I have come to enjoy reading his weekly column in the Sunday Stabroek News.

In a more recent article entitled “Lessons I never forgot”, in which he was reflecting on his learning experiences while an up-and-coming musical entertainer, I couldn’t help observing his use of the term, “I never forgot”,  which was in the Headline.  It got me to thinking of something I was doing unwittingly for many decades, with the use of that term,  “I’ll never forget”, and it’s twin, “I’ll always remember”, and realised that somehow I was using both terms, which I suppose means the same thing, very selectively.    Continue reading

Profile: The late Romesh Singh – By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

Profile: Romesh Singh -Engineer, Activist and Teacher

Romesh Singh, also known as Romesh Chandra Dutt was a person of many interests. He built radios and radars, set up communication links that brought the world closer and never lost sight of the fact that ordinary people matter. Romesh was one of the foremost telecommunications engineers of his generation that designed complex systems.

He was unassuming but firm in his convictions, and above all, he had an abiding love for his homeland, Guyana.

When you were with Romesh you knew that he stood for what was right. He did not play around with words, or said one thing and meant something else. Romesh was the genuine article, a scholar with varied interests, outspoken in his views, and always giving of his best to the community.

Read more: Profile – Romesh Singh = By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

UK Councils Condemned For ‘Shameful’ Rebranding of Black History Month 

Appropriation row comes as councils scrap the Black History Month name in favour of celebrations of all different ethnicities

Sally Weale and Robert Booth | The Guardian UK

For more than 30 years, Black History Month has been a fixture in Britain’s cultural calendar, celebrated every October in schools and at tens of thousands of events across the country.

But this year the event is at the centre of an appropriation row as campaigners complain that a number of councils have scrapped the name, describing it instead as a celebration of all different ethnicities.        Continue reading

Despite criticisms, UG prepares to bestow honorary doctorates on four Guyanese

University of Guyana

Issues confronting the Caribbean’s Ageing Diaspora and Regional Governments? – By Shamette Hepburn

By Shamette Hepburn – Stabroek News

Over several decades members of the Caribbean diaspora have observed the day to day happenings in their territories of origin. Spiraling crime rates, increased economic hardship and insecurity generally punctuate the news from back home. Yet they know that crime and violence are only a small part of Caribbean life. The rest is positive and fulfilling and Caribbean migrants remain tethered to their homelands.

Members of the Caribbean diaspora have consistently travelled between North America, the United Kingdom and the Caribbean region in order to maintain their social ties. While the vast majority of Caribbean nationals are keen to travel back and forth, some are committed to returning permanently to the Caribbean. It is this group that Caribbean governments are intent on re-incorporating into their respective national fabrics.     Continue reading

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