Category Archives: Drainage-Irrigation

CLIMATE CHANGE: Visualizing the Impact of Rising Sea Levels — by Country

VISUAL CAPITALIST: https://www.visualcapitalist.com/cp/sea-level-rises-2100-by-region/

June 24, 2022 – By  Florent Lavergne and  Carmen Ang

Visualizing the Impact of Rising Sea Levels, by Country

Climate change is already causing sea levels to rise across the globe. In the 20th century alone, it’s estimated that the mean global sea level rose by 11-16 cm.

How much will sea levels change in the coming years, and how will it affect our population?

In the below series of visualizations by Florent Lavergne, we can see how rising sea levels could impact countries in terms of flood risk by the year 2100.

These graphics use data from a 2019 study by Scott Kulp and Benjamin Strauss. Their study used CoastalDEM—a 3D graphics tool used to measure a population’s potential exposure to extreme coastal water levels—and examined rising sea levels under different levels of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.    Continue reading

GUYANA: The 2022 Floods: Kwakwani and Region 9 – affected by floods – 2 reports

Families relocate as flood waters rise in Kwakwani

Kwakwani in Region Ten (Upper Demerara – Berbice) is once again flooded after days of heavy rainfall. Several families had to relocate while others chose to remain in the upper flats of their homes, the Neighbourhood Democratic Council Vice Chairman, Cort Simeon told the News Room on Wednesday May 25, 2022.

 

More than 130 Reg. 9 residents in four flood shelters

More than 130 residents of Region (Upper Takutu- Upper Essequibo) are being housed in four shelters in various parts of Lethem as the region continues to grapple with flooding caused by heavy rainfall.

The flood water are rising rapidly.

GUYANA: The 2022 Floods: Lethem; other Rupununi areas severely flooded

EDITOR’s NOTE: The 2022 rainy season has now begun.  It usually starts in the interior regions and then moves towards the coastlands as the main rivers empty into the Atlantic Ocean. Region 5 has already been affected and in the following weeks other coastal regions will feel the effects of the increased rainfall.
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Flood waters from steadily rising rivers in neighbouring Brazil on Monday forced more than 50 persons in Lethem, the capital of  Region Nine (Upper Takatu-Upper Essequibo), to evacuate their homes and seek refuge in now filled-to-capacity government shelters, a regional spokeswoman said.          Continue reading

GUYANA: Oil, Water, and Climate Change in the Guyana-Suriname Basin – By Ivelaw Lloyd Griffith

Image: Waves batter a section of Guyana’s “Sea Wall” during a high-spring tide in 2019. Source: Loop News.

“Oil don’t ‘spoil!” So once declared Eric Williams, one-time long-standing Prime Minister of oil-rich Trinidad and Tobago. This assertion is undoubtedly true. But the distinguished scholar-statesman did not contemplate a circumstance where a dangerous mix of oil and water in the context of climate change dangers could spoil lives and livelihoods within the societies blessed with oil and gas resources.

Such is the situation with the two nations in the Guyana-Suriname Basin (GSB). Technically, the GSB includes the coastal plains of French Guiana, Suriname, Guyana, and eastern Venezuela.[1] However, the focus here is on Guyana and Suriname, the Caribbean’s emerging petro-powers.          Continue reading

GUYANA: OIL: ‘We can’t eat a new road’: Guyanese voice fears over true cost of Exxon’s oil bonanza- Opinion

The Guyanese environmentalist Arnette Arjoon alongside fishing boats docked at Liliendaal, Georgetown.
Over time, the Guyanese environmentalist Arnette Arjoon grew to suspect Exxon was indifferent to the dangers of an oil spill to the coast and rivers of one of the best preserved parts of the Amazon biome. Composite: Fidal Bassier/Guardian/Reuters

Multibillion-dollar deal promising to lift country out of poverty may be false dawn with dire impact on climate, warn campaigners

– The Guardian – Thu 12 May 2022 12.04 BST

Annette Arjoon is not anti-oil. The marine conservationist calls the vast new oilfields off Guyana’s coast a “blessing” that will earn billions of dollars for one of the poorest countries in the Caribbean, even as she recognises that pulling yet more fossil fuel from the ground will deepen the climate crisis.

But Arjoon does have a problem with who is drilling the oil. She has seen firsthand what happens when the US’s largest petroleum company descends on a small country bearing the promise of riches.                  Continue reading

GUYANA: Foreigners mistreating locals; fire pumps for drainage and Indian roadbuilders – The GHK Lall Column

GHK Lall

Encouraging Events, Disturbing Developments…  By GHK Lall

It is all negative this week, the things that disturb. Foreigners in the growing oil sector are playing games with Guyanese. They are treating us like slaves and indentured servants, with practices that hark back to slavery days and colonial times. When I read of how Guyanese workers are being treated, rage and disgust flares. It is as if nothing has changed, after all the heartfelt promises, the warm smiles, and warmer handshakes, and this being the era of political correctness, where every word and posture is measured and remeasured to ensure there are no missteps.

GUYANESE WORKERS MISTREATED                  Continue reading

WORLD: Why Indonesia is Moving Their Capital City – Video

WORLD: Why Indonesia is Moving Their Capital City – Video

RealLifeLore Video – January 22, 2022 – Some comments + link to video

Aldy Habibie – Since i’m from West borneo myself. I can assure you that Borneo is like a wet dream for tropical city designer because most tropical islands are small and dangerous due to volcanic activities and earthquake, Borneo never had any of that (i live here for 20 years and never in my life have i experienced an earthquake). However, enviromental problem caused by palm oil industry can already be seen across the island. So here’s hoping that moving a huge administration center like The state capital would see more regulations actually being enforced more effectively.
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GUYANA: Georgetown: Several parts of city flooded after heavy rain – UPDATED

-taskforce on alert

A section of Subryanville
A section of Subryanville

The Civil Defence Commission (CDC) today said it has received reports that several locations in and around Georgetown are flooded.

As a result, the National Flood Taskforce, the National Drainage and Irrigation Authority (NDIA), the Hydrometeorological Office, relevant Ministries, City Engineers and the Mayor’s Office, all Regional Executive Officers and the CDC are on high alert and are closely monitoring the situation, a CDC release said.      Continue reading

Guyana: Victoria farmers to benefit from emergency drainage works after years of neglect

– works scheduled to commence in next 3-5 days

Victoria Village is located on the Atlantic coast of Guyana, 29 kilometres east of Georgetown and bordered by Cove and John to the west and Belfield to the east. It was the FIRST VILLAGE IN BRITISH GUIANA (GUYANA), to be bought by the combined resources of Africans who had recently won their freedom from slavery. Wikipedia

Dec 25, 2021 – Kaieteur News – Farmers from Victoria Village, a farming community located on the East Coast of Demerara, will soon benefit from a number of much-needed drainage works following years of neglect and underdevelopment.

This is according to a release issued by the Ministry of Agriculture. It noted that during a meeting on Wednesday afternoon, Agriculture Minister, Zulfikar Mustapha told the farmers that most of their drainage woes will soon be behind them in the coming week as emergency works will commence within the next three to five days.      Continue reading

Guyana: Climate Change impacts could cost oil rich Guyana US$800M – Gov’t Report

— Govt. Report says over 300,000 citizens could be harmed

By Kiana Wilburg – Nov 25, 2021 – Kaieteur News – Since the 1960s, increases in temperature, sea level and extreme rainfall have exposed just how vulnerable Guyana is to climate change. This frightening global phenomenon has resulted in more than US$600M in losses. That figure could however see an alarming spike as two government reports predict that more climate woes of potentially catastrophic proportions lie ahead for the world’s latest oil exploration hotspot.

Some of the homes that were almost submerged during the May-June 2021 flooding.

 

According to the 2015 Climate Resilience Strategy and Action Plan for Guyana, climate change will no doubt alter the characteristics of hazards Guyana is exposed to (e.g. average annual rainfall) and the nature of variability (e.g. more intense storms, irregular seasonal rainfall), which will hamper the nation’s socio-economic development objectives.              Continue reading

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