Category Archives: Drainage-Irrigation

Guyana History: Village problems in Guyana 100 years ago – By Winston McGowan

-Stabroek News – April 12, 2001 – By Winston McGowan 

This article will focus on conditions in eighteen villages of Guyana, which one hundred years ago were under the control of the Central Board of Health. These villages were for the most part inhabited mainly by Africans.

They included Sparendaam, Plaisance, Beterverwagting, Buxton and Friendship, Golden Grove and Nabaclis, Victoria and Ann’s Grove and Two Friends on the East Coast of Demerara, Agricola, Mocha and Craig on the East Bank, Bagotville, Goed Intent and Sisters, and Stanleytown on the West Bank, Den Amstel and Fellowship and De Kinderen on the West Coast of Demerara, Queenstown and Danielstown in Essequibo and Cumberland in Berbice.

About one hundred years ago these villages were experiencing serious problems which made life for the residents very challenging. Perhaps their most fundamental and most disturbing problem was geophysical, namely, their inability for the most part to cope effectively with the formidable challenges of sea and river defence, drainage and irrigation. These difficulties stemmed from the fact that the coast was below sea level, the rivers often overflowed their banks and the country frequently suffered from seasons of heavy rainfall.

READ MORE:  Village problems in Guyana 100 years ago

Guyana Institute of Historical Research – GIHR – Online Newsletter – April 2019

            DOWNLOAD: GIHR Online Newsletter – April 2019

Guyana: No obstruction on public road reserves – Ministry of Public Infrastructure.

All road reserves to be cleared by April 1. 2019

Example of Obstruction

Water is Everywhere in Georgetown, Guyana – By Melinda Janki

Water is Everywhere in Georgetown, Guyana — Our Disrespect for it will Kill Us — By Melinda Janki

Melinda Janki

Water is ubiquitous in Georgetown. There is a drain outside every house, flowing towards a canal. Old photos show the beauty of the waterways that comprised the original drainage system for the city.

Guyana sits on what was once known as the “wild coast” of South America. The area was a dangerous swamp that struck terror in the hearts of European adventurers seeking the fabled city of El Dorado. Even Sir Walter Raleigh is rumoured to have come here in search of gold. The name “Guiana” is said to come from an Amerindian word meaning “land of many waters”. Like many myths, it is charming but unsupported by evidence. Water is, however, a dominant motif of Guyana and certainly of Georgetown, the capital city. Water is also likely to end Georgetown’s existence before the 21st century comes to a close.

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Guyana’s Waterways – By Dave Martins

Guyana’s Waterways – By Dave Martins

Dave Martins

Stabroek News – Sunday 27 Jan 2019

Growing up in Guyana, or coming here to live, our waterways are part of your life. For me, growing up in West Demerara at Hague, in a house by the seaside, it was the rowdy Atlantic, a hundred yards away, and the long straight canal running from the village road, straight as an arrow, about a mile, past the train line, all the way to Hague Backdam where farmers planted rice and kept cattle.

Later, as we moved to live at Vreed-en-Hoop, travelling daily to school in town, it was the Demerara River, with the government ferry boats – Querriman; Lady Northcote; and the small, appropriately named, Hassar – where we would watch the few small cars on deck, with wooden chocks holding them in place. Surely they would be pitched into the sea when the Hassar rolled – and roll it did, but the chocks held.      Continue reading

Caribbean Has Become Much Drier, Says The Caribbean Climate Outlook Forum

BRIDGETOWN, Barbados, February 5, 2019 (CMC) – The Barbados-based The Caribbean Climate Outlook Forum (CariCOF) says since December, last year, many parts of the Caribbean have become drier.

“Major concerns exist in the southern Caribbean, including from northern Guyana to Barbados and west to the ABC Islands (Aruba, Bonaire and Curacao) for short term drought that can impact small rivers, streams and ponds, by the end of April 2019,” announced CariCOF in its February issue of the Caribbean Drought Bulletin, released here, today.             Continue reading

Technology: How to Be Invisible on the Internet – By Jeff Desjardins

How to Be Invisible on the Internet

Everywhere you look, concerns are mounting about internet privacy.

Although giving up your data was once an afterthought when gaining access to the newest internet services such as Facebook and Uber, many people have had their perspective altered by various recent scandals, billions of dollars of cybertheft, and a growing discomfort around how their personal data may be used in the future.

More people want to opt out of this data collection, but aside from disconnecting entirely or taking ludicrous measures to safeguard information, there aren’t many great options available to limit what is seen and known about you online.

THE NEXT BEST THING            Continue reading

Why should I care about rising sea levels? – By Rosaliene Bacchus

Three Worlds One Vision

Price Reduced Waterfront Property

Price Reduced Waterfront Property – East Coast USA
Photo Credit: Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) June 2018 Report

On September 14th, Hurricane Florence hit the North Carolina coast. With warmer oceans driven by climate change, the massive, slow-moving storm dumped more than 20 inches of rain on its arrival. The storm surge reached levels of 9 to 13 feet. Hundreds of inundated home owners may never recover from the damages.

Ten years ago, on September 15, 2008, another kind of disaster struck our nation with the collapse of Lehman Brothers and the insurance giant AIG. The worst financial crisis since the Great Depression sent rogue waves across our nation and worldwide. The fallout—foreclosures, shrinking home values, and millions of job losses—battered Americans.

With rising sea levels—the result of ongoing heating of our oceans and atmosphere—another massive, slow-moving crisis is brewing. Hundreds of thousands of coastal properties will increasingly face chronic…

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Caribbean Cricket: Exciting Playoffs Await Hero CPL Qualifiers…playing at Providence Stadium

Exciting Playoffs Await Hero CPL Qualifiers… Amazon Warriors tackle Knight Riders tonight; Tallawahs face Patriots tomorrow @ Providence

The Captains from left Chris Gayle, Dwayne Bravo, Chris Green and Andre Russell.

By Zaheer Mohamed
For the first time in the history of the Hero Caribbean Premier League (CPL) T20, Providence will be hosting matches in the playoffs and fans can expect more excitement since some of the biggest names in T20 leagues will be on show.       Continue reading

GuySuCo: massive procurement fraud – Billions wasted and stolen

GuySuCo has over $3B in outdated Fiat tractor spares in stock

– growing evidence of massive procurement fraud over time

The suspicions were there all along. But the evidence was missing. Until now.
In recent years, the state-owned Guyana Sugar Corporation (GuySuCo) has been asking for and receiving billions of dollars annually in bailouts to pay workers and creditors.

The fortunes of the company have been steadily declining, with production plunging and poor maintenance, theft and the quality of agriculture at its lowest. Despite that, consecutive administrations facing watchful unions and a 16,000-plus strong workforce were unwilling to resist GuySuCo’s demands for cash.    Continue reading

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