Daily Archives: 02/21/2021

GUYANA: Popular storyteller and singer ‘Auntie Comesee’ turns 100

“Auntie Comesee”, with family friend Melanie Seaton, daughter of Retired GDF Colonel Pluto Martindale (deceased).

By Frederick Halley

LAMENTING that she hasn’t been able to attend church, concerts and the gym over the last year or so because of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, celebrated a significant milestone on February 8, 2021. The famous storyteller and singer who over the years thrilled audiences in Guyana and Toronto, Canada with her unique style, turned 100.      Continue reading

Guyanese-born Surgeon and Team Saved MLK’s Life After 1958 Harlem Stabbing – Opinion

Black History Month; The West Indian – F

 Plaque dedicating THE AUBREY MAYNARD CARDIAC OPERATING SUITE at Harlem Hospital. (Photo by C. Aklu)

Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his last speech, “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop,” on April 3, 1968, at the Mason Temple in Memphis Tennessee. The following day, April 4, 1968 he was assassinated by James Earl Wray as he stood on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel.

But his role and achievements in the Civil Rights Movement may have been a lot shorter and less impactful, had it not been for a great team of surgeons and staff that saved his life 10 years earlier in New York City’s Harlem.            Continue reading

OPINION: Who Am I Culturally? – by: Jean Janki Samaroo

Written by: Jean Janki Samaroo

Am I Guyanese, British-Guyanese, Indo-Guyanese, South American, Canadian, Guyanese-Canadian, or some blend of these different cultures? Is my background East-Indian, West-Indian or Indo-Caribbean? What about the fact that my geographical place of birth was South America? Am I just an eclectic person— one of mixed cultural heritages?

The simple answer is that I have been influenced by a diversity of cultures from the day I was born. Whether I’m definitely one thing or the other is worth questioning but the answer that I have will be different to that of another person from the same background. Guyanese are not all the same just as Canadians are not all the same. There are variables.

READ MORE: https://www.browngirldiary.com/post/who-am-i-culturally

RACISM: Ethnic minorities and colorism impacts – By Akola Thompson

 By

From the beginning of racism, colorism has existed; that is not an opinion, it is a fact. While many of us are aware of racism and its harmful impacts, a blank is usually drawn when it comes to the treatment that is meted out against persons of a dark skin tone. Colorism affects all non-white ethnicities but Black persons face the brunt of its impacts.       

When the topic of colorism is brought up, particularly in the Black community, there is a pushback against it. Persons seem to be of the belief that to speak about the realities of colorism is somehow divisive. As an already marginalized group of people, it is said that colorism dialogues seeks to push a wedge between communities. This reluctance to speak about it does not negate its everyday impacts on dark skinned people.    Continue reading