US POLITICS: Tribute to Vice President Kamala Harris – Video

Sung by Carol Panton “Sweet C”

Post a comment or leave a trackback: Trackback URL.

Comments

  • Clyde Duncan  On 01/19/2021 at 12:45 am

    Opinion | Vogue and the Veep – a Tale of White Racism

    Sefy Hendler | Haaretz

    What happens when the most powerful white woman in the fashion world meets a black woman who will this week become one of the most powerful women in the world?

    THE FORMER SHOWS THE LATTER WHO’S THE BOSS, OF COURSE.

    The controversial Vogue cover photo of Kamala Harris, who is about to be sworn in as Vice President of the United States, is much more than a lesson in fashion.

    In fact, it constitutes a rare occasion in which one can get such a revealing X-ray view of the workings of image-making in the world of fashion.

    THIS IS MAINLY A REMINDER AND A WARNING ABOUT WHAT AWAITS A BLACK WOMAN IN PLACES WHERE SHE HAS NEVER SET FOOT.

    A brief overview of the affair that made waves worldwide includes facts that are not disputed:

    Harris was invited to appear on the cover of the February issue of the American edition of Vogue, the most influential fashion magazine in the world. The informal photo chosen raised a furor as soon as it appeared, with the claim that “the cover did not give Kamala D. Harris due respect,” as described by the Washington Post’s fashion critic, who added that this was not surprising, coming from Vogue.

    Vogue’s Editor-in-Chief Anna Wintour understood the damage done and released an online cover page – a shelved version? – in which Harris appears, arms crossed, in a tailored suit that gives her a much more authoritative look.

    Wintour explained in regard to the controversial cover that “it was absolutely not our intention to, in any way, diminish the importance of the vice-president-elect’s incredible victory.”

    BUT LOOKING AT THE IMAGE MAKES ONE WONDER ABOUT THIS STATEMENT.

    The image that was chosen for the print-edition cover was described by Vogue as a homage to the African-American sorority to which Harris belonged in her student days, Alpha Kappa Alpha, with its green and reddish-pink colors.

    Harris is seen standing with a background of drapes in these colors, which dominate the composition, wearing All-Star shoes that have become her trademark.

    An art-loving viewer cannot avoid being reminded of one of the most famous portraits ever made of a powerful man, that of Pope Julius II, painted by Rafael around 1511. With the green-draped backdrop and the pope’s red robe, the portrait became a model for how authoritative leaders have been presented for the last 500 years.

    The powerful head of the church – called in his lifetime the “terrible pope” – was painted in a precise, meticulous manner, to which Rafael added a touch of contemplation and vulnerable humanity in the subject. Anna Wintour and her photographer Tyler Mitchell deliberately unraveled the dignified decorum of a ceremonial representation.

    IT WASN’T JUST THE ALL-STAR SHOES; IT WAS ALSO THE RUMPLED RED CLOTH CAST ON THE FLOOR.

    The festive portrait meant to celebrate Harris’ assumption of her new role became one showing a mundane look, bordering on sloppy.

    THE POPE AND HIS ELEGANT DRAPES ENDED UP AS A WOMAN IN SPORTS SHOES, WITH A CRUMPLED CLOTH DEVOID OF ANY ELEGANCE.

    The art historian Vasari wrote that Rafael’s portrait of Julius II caused anyone viewing it to shiver, so great was Rafael’s skill and so great the terror imposed by the pope on his surroundings.

    It turns out that in the United States of 2020, even when the most senior politician comes to have a portrait taken, staged by Anna Wintour, the one expected to shiver is still Harris.

    An important lesson, one moment before the first female vice-president in history enters the oh-so-White House left behind by Donald Trump.

  • Clyde Duncan  On 01/19/2021 at 2:05 am

    Vogue Afraid Of Kamala Harris?

    Liz Braun | Toronto Sun

    This week’s tempest in a teapot concerns a Vogue magazine cover photo of Vice President-elect Kamala Harris.

    It is a BLAH PHOTO.

    Harris is casually dressed, Converse sneakers and all, smiling and standing as if she’s not quite sure what to do with her hands.

    It’s a picture that manages to make a formidable woman — “Mr. Vice President, I am speaking” — look small; the image is overwhelmed by a pink and green cascade of fabric, a nod to Harris’ sorority at Howard University, Alpha Kappa Alpha.

    As the bible of the fashion world, Vogue has particular standards, so the unimpressive photograph of Harris ignited a firestorm of anger and disappointment.

    Many took to social media to say the photo was disrespectful to Harris’ position and authority — this is, after all, the woman who is days away from being formally recognized as the second most powerful elected official in the United States.

    “Kind of messy” is how the New York Times summed up the picture, and indeed it is.

    Canadian talk show host Lilly Singh is quoted in the Hollywood Reporter saying, “When this photo was released, the internet immediately freaked out, and with good reason. Because we’re just like, ‘Is this the best that you can make the VP look?’”

    Much has been read into the photograph — what it has, what it doesn’t have.

    The photographer, Tyler Mitchell, is black; he shot the famed Vogue cover with Beyoncé in 2018, and in so doing became the first black photographer to shoot a Vogue cover.

    Vanity Fair magazine’s first cover shot by a black photographer, an electrifying portrait of Viola Davis by Dario Calmese, happened just last summer. Six months ago. No — truly.

    The photograph of Vice President-elect Harris chosen for the magazine cover is said to have been a surprise even to her camp. Two photos had been approved; a second picture of Harris, looking mighty capable in a pale blue power suit, is the picture her team thought would be the cover.

    VOGUE CHOSE THE CASUAL PICTURE.

    When the negative reactions started, Anna Wintour explained to the New York Times that given the pandemic and all, what they were going for was a less formal photo, something “accessible and approachable and real,” that would reflect the Biden-Harris campaign.

    Vogue is not exactly a bastion of integration. Just last summer, after the death of George Floyd, Anna Wintour had to formerly apologize for giving short shrift to black editors, writers, photographers, designers and other creatives; oh, look!

    Vogue is racist as well as ageist and sizeist.

    Washington D.C.-based Canadian marketing consultant Anne Jardine thinks Vogue missed the boat in not capturing the obvious power Harris displayed during the debates, “When she was kicking ass and taking names.”

    As for the idea that Vogue wanted Harris to look approachable, “How very quaint and old fashioned,” said Jardine.

    “No! I want her to look powerful, formidable, like the president in waiting that she is.”

    In America, where they don’t much like women and they certainly don’t like people of colour, Kamala Harris must strike terror into the heart of every gun-totin’ white supremacist bozo out there.

    And so she should, particularly after four years of an administration that welcomed racism and fomented hate and division.

    As Karen Attiah summed up last week in the Washington Post, “Black accomplishment in White patriarchal power systems is always fraught.”

  • kamtanblog  On 01/19/2021 at 3:48 am

    The two most impressive attributes of Kamala

    1. She is a woman
    2. She is if colour

    Thirdly
    She is a political “first”

    Lady in waiting

    A breadth of fresh air !

    Kamtan uk-ex-EU

  • Clyde Duncan  On 01/19/2021 at 6:23 pm

    Vogue To Release New Kamala Harris Cover After Original Sparks Backlash

    Magazine plans limited edition with new photo after original was widely seen as disrespectful

    Priya Elan | The Guardian UK

    Vogue will publish a limited print edition of its February issue, featuring Kamala Harris, with a new photo following widespread backlash against an original cover image widely held to lack respect for the vice-president-elect.

    The limited edition, with a cover image previously used online, will be published after inauguration ceremonies on Wednesday, when Harris will become the first woman and the first person of Black and south Asian descent sworn in as vice-president.

    The original cover image, showing Harris wearing Converse sneakers and casual clothes, sparked ire on social media, users questioning why Vogue would choose the image over the more formal online cover featuring Harris in a powder blue Michael Kors suit in front of a gold background.

    The Washington Post fashion critic Robin Givhan wrote: “Vogue robbed Harris of her roses. A bit of awe would have served the magazine well in its cover decisions. Nothing about the cover said, ‘Wow!’ And sometimes, that’s all Black women want, an admiring and celebratory ‘wow’ over what they have accomplished.”

    There were also questions over lighting, considering Harris’s skin tone. Vogue was previously criticised for its lighting of the gymnast Simone Biles, its August cover star.

    A Vogue spokesperson said: “In recognition of the enormous interest in the digital cover and in celebration of this historic moment, we will be publishing a limited number of special edition inauguration issues.”

    The news was also shared on Instagram.

    Last week, the editor-in-chief, Anna Wintour, explained that the original photo – by Tyler Mitchell, in 2018 the first African American photographer to shoot a US Vogue cover – was chosen for its accessibility and approachability.

    Wintour also discussed negative reaction to the photo.

    “Obviously we have heard and understood the reaction to the print cover,” Wintour told the New York Times, “and I just want to reiterate that it was absolutely not our intention to, in any way, diminish the importance of the vice-president-elect’s incredible victory.”

  • the only  On 01/20/2021 at 1:54 pm

    And Vogue gets richer, this is called marketing.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: