Guyanese Words and Names – By Geoff Burrowes + Video “Song of Guyana’s Children”

 By Geoff Burrowes

If you or your parents are Guyanese you have probably heard some or all of these words: (phonetical spellings)

        Kiskadee, Blue Saki, Carrion Crow, Crapaud, Mypuri, Fowl cock, Buxton Spice mango, Starapple, Mami apple, Golden Apple, Sugar Apple, Awara, Genip, Jamoon, Breadfruit, Mauger like a Yow, Hungish, Bruk Foot, Nharra, Fresh Cold, Banga Mary, Hassah, Patwa, Mauby, Ginger Beer, Man Piaba, Woman Piaba, Granny Backbone, Lemon Grass, Conga Pump, Wirry wirry pepper, Karilla.     

If these expressions cause a sweet jump in your spirits enjoy it and don’t regret the past. Enjoy the future. In spite of the pandemic it’s there stretching away before us! Happy times and sad times – we can hope the happy outweigh the sad!

We can probably all use words of encouragement as the pandemic Christmas approaches – and it’s only the truth!

        For those of us who are immigrants in our new countries we are facing a new and exciting time! We are forging a new breed. Australian, West Indian, English, Canadian, American, European, and many other nations but all salted with Guyanese blood. As the “Song of Guyana’s Children” exhorts us “great wide and deep in our lives will we be!” Wherever we have gone we have enriched the native culture. We tend to be smart, hardworking, thoughtful, helpful, good neighbours, good friends, good colleagues and in all, a useful, valuable part of our new communities! Let’s not ever forget that!

        Whether we be Indigenous, White, Black, Indian, Portuguese, and Mixed we will probably over generations marry into the races of our new countries and hopefully all become red. Think of all the red Guyanese you knew and the excellent contributions that they  brought into our midst!

Dave Martin, the Guyanese troubadour, wrote about the hope in Guyana and the indomitable resilience of the Guyanese spirit and I know that it will continue to show in the diaspora during the coming generations!

Song of Guyana’s Children – Video

With beautiful rose blooming …Here are the lyrics:

  • Born In the land of the mighty Roraima,
  • Land of great rivers and far stretching sea;
  • So like the mountain, the sea and the river
  • Great, wide and deep in our lives would we be;

Chorus Onward, upward, may we ever go Day by day In strength and beauty grow, Till at length we each of us may show, What Guyana’s sons and daughters can be.

  • Born In the land of Kaieteur’s shining splendour
  • Land of the palm tree, the croton and fern,
  • We would possess all the virtues and graces,
  • We all the glory of goodness would learn.
  • CHORUS
  • Born in the land where men sought El Dorado,
  • Land of the Diamond and bright shining gold,
  • We would build up by our faith, love and labour,
  • God’s golden city which never grows old.
  • CHORUS
  • Thus to the land which to us God has given
  • May our young lives bring a gift rich and rare,
  • Thus, as we grow, may the worth of Guyana
  • Shine with a glory beyond all compare.

******************

A rose does not think of competing with the rose next to It….. It just blooms.

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OnDjfpzitx4

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Comments

  • kamtanblog  On 11/27/2020 at 1:06 am

    Interestingly entertaining !
    Guyana belongs to no one
    It belongs to everyone !

    So does planet earth !
    and the universe !

    Brainstorming FMI

    Kamtan

  • wally n  On 11/27/2020 at 2:08 pm

    Great memories….as a young kid I loved to sing that song, the head mistress would take me gently to the back row, I knew why, too loud and out of tune.
    Anyway when I first came to Canada my youngest daughter was asked by her Canadian teacher, if she knew the sound made by a crow. She said no, so I received a call from the school, they proceeded to tell me, my daughter might be “slow” then they brought up the incident.
    It was funny, to me, so I suggested to the teacher, I will stay in the office until she, the teacher, made the sound of the Kiskadee. That solved that.
    Would you believe, last week my youngest daughter received a call from my (favourite) grandson’s teacher, claiming he was making up “things” namely some bird called a Kiskadee!!!
    I give up….

  • Anthony Gomes  On 11/28/2020 at 6:20 pm

    So surprising that in my eightieth year I can still remember the words.

  • Ronald O'Brien Saywack  On 12/16/2020 at 3:16 pm

    The human race — my thoughts:

    “Whether we be Indigenous, White, Black, Indian, Portuguese, and Mixed we will probably over generations marry into the races of our new countries and hopefully all become red.” Burrowes.

    I’d like to say, unequivocally, that there is only one race on this planet, no matter where we reside, no matter what we look like or what the color of our skin is. That race is the human race. This is not conjecture or guesswork, it’s a fact.

    Our ancestral homeland is Mother Africa. Full stop.

    Once we fully understand this reality, it may become easier for us to stop labeling ourselves, provincializing ourselves, isolating ourselves, and become more accepting of one another ‘as our fellow humans’.

    The Africans who migrated north into Europe and other colder regions hundreds of thousands of years ago gradually turned light-complected because of diminished sunlight and reduced production of melanin in the dermis. It is melanin or its reduction, that determines skin color, eye color, hair color, etc. The more sunlight our ancestors received, the darker the skin; the less sunlight, the lighter the skin.

    It is therefore not a coincidence that people living in cold regions are light-skinned and those close to the Equator are dark-skinned.

    (Yours truly has spent decades studying the fascinating migratory history of man on planet Earth, among many other disciplines.)

    It is important to note that the Earth is a very, very old place. It is more than four and a half billion years. To put it into perspective, a billion is one thousand million. It is a time span too vast for our minds to grasp.

    Humans have been living and surviving in Africa for millions of years. Our numbers were small, lifespans short, and mortality rates high. There were many rival human-like species that ultimately became extinct. The last were the Neandertals that died out 40,000 years ago.

    It’s astonishing that our species survived to become the dominant (as well as most destructive) species.

    Our species, arguably, came very close to extinction 75,000 years ago when a supervolcano (Toba) erupted on the Indonesian island of Sumatra which blocked out sunlight over a vast area of Earth for an extended period that resulted in widespread extinction. Some scholars surmise that the number of humans was consequently reduced to only a few thousand.

    In the final analysis, we’d all share the exact same skin color if the temperature was equal all over the world.

    Peace and happy holidays to all.

    Cheers, Ron Saywack.

    ______________________________________________________________-

    “Kiskadee, Blue Saki, Carrion Crow, Crapaud, Mypuri, Fowl cock, Buxton Spice mango, Starapple, Mami apple, Golden Apple, Sugar Apple, Awara, Genip, Jamoon, Breadfruit, Mauger like a Yow, Hungish, Bruk Foot, Nharra, Fresh Cold, Banga Mary, Hassah, Patwa, Mauby, Ginger Beer, Man Piaba, Woman Piaba, Granny Backbone, Lemon Grass, Conga Pump, Wirry wirry pepper, Karilla.” Burrowes.

    Most of the above names are familiar. However, a few are not. For example, Mami apple, Hungish, Man piaba, Woman piabs, Granny backbone, and a few others.

    • kamtanblog  On 12/16/2020 at 8:39 pm

      Question
      Where do the “aliens” come from ?
      Or don’t they exist !

      Just wondering

      Kamtan aka ET

      • geoffburrowes  On 03/19/2021 at 8:07 am

        Anthony did you wok in BG Insurannce Agencies in the 1950s 1960s. If so – greetings and best wishes!

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