China extends its reach into Guyana – By Mat Youkee – Dialogo Chino

Poised to become a top oil producer, the small country is also a key logistical link in regional trade

With Chinese investment that isolation could soon be a thing of the past.

In the coming months, the Inter-American Development Bank (IADB) is set to deliver its report on a Guyana–Brazil transport link and a deepwater port project for the northern coast.         

Today, the Runupuni border town of Lethem is a 14-hour ride along dirt roads from the Guyanese capital, Georgetown. Red dirt is set to be placed by asphalt and Lethem converted into a major trading hub. China is expected to provide the required capital and carry out construction work.

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Comments

  • walter  On February 14, 2019 at 2:04 pm

    If Guyana fails to add secure safe guards to protect the country from being raped by China, it cannot be because of ignorance, maybe GREED. The evidence of the underhanded planning, the dishonesty in every part of the Chinese participation, is recorded throughout the world. They have everything to gain, nothing to lose.

    • Trevor  On February 14, 2019 at 6:39 pm

      Chiney man will re-own those roads and ports. They did this to Sri Lanka and a few African countries.

  • guyaneseonline  On February 14, 2019 at 10:01 pm

    Guyana, a logistical hub for China’s expansion in the region

    Feb 06, 2019- Kaieteur News – By Abena Rockcliffe-Campbell

    “(China) also will likely include enhanced river and multimodal routes linking Brazil to the Atlantic in a southerly direction through Paraguay, Uruguay, and Argentina, and north to the Atlantic through the Guiana Shield, with improved highways through northern Brazil to the Atlantic coast of Guyana and Suriname.”- Dr. Evan Ellis.

    It is not by chance that Guyana became the first English-speaking country in South America to sign on to the Belt and Road Initiative. Many believe that China values its relations with Guyana which is strategically located as a logistical hub suited for China’s expansion in the Region.

    Last month, Diálogo Chino reported that Guyana is a key logistical link in regional trade.
    Diálogo Chino is the only independent journalism platform dedicated to better understanding the China-Latin America relationship and its sustainable development challenges.
    Diálogo Chino said that the Guyana road link highlights the strategic nature “of the small country to China’s plans in Latin America. It would cut transport times to northern Brazil, China’s biggest trading partner in the region, by providing a faster route to the Panama Canal.”

    Diálogo Chino also quoted Sasenerine Singh saying “China sees Guyana as a conduit to northern Brazil…A road link from Manaus to Guyana would cut thousands of kilometres off the shipping route along the Amazon River.”

    But further to this, China’s plans were highlighted in a detailed paper written by Centre for Strategic and International Studies’ (CSIS) Dr. Evan Ellis. The paper, titled “The Future of Latin America and the Caribbean in the Context of the Rise of China, points out what China has already achieved and what it is likely to achieve within 30 years based on its current trajectory.

    While examining the implications of China’s “greatly expanded position” as banker, employer, and military and political partner in Latin America and the Caribbean, Dr. Ellis considered some of the possible dynamics by sector.
    Looking at construction/infrastructure, Dr. Ellis said that although many of the effects of the growth of Latin America’s Pacific-facing infrastructure will occur within national borders, others will be international.

    He said, “In South America, a transcontinental infrastructure that includes a network of highways, train, and river routes will connect Brazil to the Atlantic, the Caribbean, and the Pacific.

    “Such connections will probably include train linkages across the Amazon to Peru’s northern cost, and a more southerly train route through Bolivia to southern Peru and northern Chile.”

    The research professor added, “They also will likely include enhanced river and multimodal routes linking Brazil to the Atlantic in a southerly direction through Paraguay, Uruguay, and Argentina, and north to the Atlantic through the Guiana Shield, with improved highways through northern Brazil to the Atlantic coast of Guyana and Suriname.”

    Dr. Ellis said that the infrastructure will increase the flows of people and goods across all ten countries’ land borders.

    This will focus Brazil’s attention to the security of those borders and foster coordination with its neighbours, while increasing Brazil’s interest in their internal affairs, affecting that country’s coordination and security.

    Last year July when Guyana signed onto the Belt and Road Initiative, Foreign Affairs Minister, Carl Greenidge, said that Guyana is very much interested in improving its infrastructure.

    Government’s Department of Information reported, “The Minister of Foreign Affairs hinted that there exists a possibility that the Linden-Lethem highway, particularly the Kurupukari to Lethem phase as well as the new proposed Demerara Harbour Bridge could be financed under this initiative.”

    From all reports, the road from Brazil to Guyana will be mostly of benefit to China.

  • walter  On February 15, 2019 at 2:41 pm

    “From all reports, the road from Brazil to Guyana will be mostly of benefit to China.”
    If there is any truth in this, then GUYANA has some major trump cards[sorry] in it’s hands. So instead of blindly following, tell those criminals, not willing to pay one grain of sand towards their agenda.
    Any roadway, highway built on GUYANA’S soil will be built at no cost to us, remain the property of the country, and GUYANA can toll it, block it whatever may become necessary in the future, thus preventing another “Berbice Bridge Fiasco”
    Why would I suggest this, I think Guyana can wait, there is no immediate requirement, and if the oil money kicks in, we might be able to pay for our own road to Brazil, then hook up to the highway in Brazil.
    The Chinese have shown no respect for contracts, and broke ass third world countries, recent reports show how they casually step in and take over if there is a default, so it is possible that Guyana can end up using their oil money to repay these crooks.
    New wave colonization, surprising easy apparently, China only have to shake a few shiny objects and they can own whatever/whoever they want.
    If the politicians want to suck low hanging ramen appendages do it alone, they might find it hard to swallow, don’t take the people with you.
    The damage could be irreparable, and as someone mentioned before, next wave, Chinese migration.
    Come on guys, Guyana might finally have an opportunity to carve out it’s own destiny, why slip the chains of a predator around your neck.

    • Trevor  On February 16, 2019 at 3:26 pm

      Chiney man own most of the high rises in GT.

  • walter n  On February 15, 2019 at 2:46 pm

    “From all reports, the road from Brazil to Guyana will be mostly of benefit to China.”
    If there is any truth in this, then GUYANA has some major trump cards[sorry] in it’s hands. So instead of blindly following, tell those criminals, not willing to pay one grain of sand towards their agenda.
    Any roadway, highway built on GUYANA’S soil will be built at no cost to us, remain the property of the country, and GUYANA can toll it, block it whatever may become necessary in the future, thus preventing another “Berbice Bridge Fiasco”
    Why would I suggest this, I think Guyana can wait, there is no immediate requirement, and if the oil money kicks in, we might be able to pay for our own road to Brazil, then hook up to the highway in Brazil.
    The Chinese have shown no regards for contracts, no respect for broke ass third world countries, recent reports show how they casually step in and take over if there is a default, so it is possible that Guyana can end up using their oil money to repay these crooks.
    New wave colonization, surprising easy apparently, China only have to shake a few shiny objects and they can own whatever/whoever they want.
    If the politicians want to suck low hanging ramen appendages do it alone, they might find it hard to swallow, so don’t take the people with you. The damage could be irreparable, and as someone mentioned before, next wave, Chinese migration.

    Come on guys, Guyana might finally have an opportunity to carve out it’s own destiny, why slip the chains of a predator around your neck.

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