‘Parents killed it’: why Facebook is losing its teenage users

‘Parents killed it’: why Facebook is losing its teenage users

This year more than 3 million under-25s in the UK and US are expected to leave the site

Facebook, SnapChat and WhatsApp apps.
 About 44% of Snapchat’s users are aged 18 to 24, compared with 20% of Facebook’s:. Alamy Stock Photo

When Mark Zuckerberg launched Facebook he was a 19-year-old living in a dorm in his second year at university. Fast-forward 14 years and it is the young people he was so successful in luring to Facebook to propel it to become the world’s biggest social networking site that are now his biggest problem.

This year more than 3 million under-25s in the UK and US will either quit Facebook or stop using it regularly, and they are pretty vocal about why.        

“As soon as parents got in they killed it,” says 24-year-old Jordan Ranford, a now minimal Facebook user who ditched his mum as a friend because she was “just jarring”.

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  • guyaneseonline  On June 3, 2018 at 5:14 am

    Teens are abandoning Facebook in dramatic numbers, study finds

    Numbers using Facebook have dropped significantly since 2015, with YouTube, Instagram and Snapchat more popular

    Teenagers have abandoned Facebook in favour of other social media platforms such as Snapchat and Instagram, according to a study from the Pew Research Center.

    Just 51% of US individuals aged 13 to 17 say they use Facebook – a dramatic plunge from the 71% who said they used the social network in Pew’s previous study in 2015, when it was the dominant online platform.

    In this year’s study reported Facebook use was, according to Pew, “notably lower” than the percentage of teens who said they used YouTube (85%), Instagram (72%) or Snapchat (69%). In the previous study, just 52% of teens said they used Instagram, while 41% said they used Snapchat. YouTube was not included in the 2014-2015 survey.

    Use of Facebook was markedly higher among lower-income teens, with 70% of those living in households earning less than $30,000 a year using the platform, compared with just 36% of those whose annual family income is $75,000 or more.
    READ MORE

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