Guyana’s Itiribisi Lake and the Amerindian reservation community called Mashabo

Guyana’s Itiribisi Lake and the Amerindian reservation community called Mashabo

By realadmin / Published on Monday, 14 Sep 2015 – Photos by Alva Solomon.
Itiribisi Lake, one of Guyana’s aquatic gems, located on the Essequibo Coast. The lake is said to be the largest of the few which are located in Region 2. We travelled across the lake and spent a quiet day at the Amerindian reservation community called Mashabo. The view here is absolutely spectacular.
A view of the lake as soon as one enters the area from the Huis t'Dieren Public Road on the Essequibo Coast. The road which connects the lake to Huis t'Dieren takes about 10 minutes by car
A view of the lake as soon as one enters the area from the Huis t’Dieren Public Road on the Essequibo Coast. The road which connects the lake to Huis t’Dieren takes about 10 minutes by car  

A view of the waters within the lake
A view of the waters within the lake
The community of Mashabo is visible as one passes through the center of the waterway

The community of Mashabo is visible as one passes through the center of the waterway

Lake 25

A bridge connecting twp parts of Mashabo

This bridge which was built by the government ,connects Mashabo to another section of the reservation. The 648 feet long structure is a wonderful sight was one nears Mashabo.

This bridge which was built by the government ,connects Mashabo to another section of the reservation. The 648 feet long structure is a wonderful sight was one nears Mashabo.

The arrival port at Mashabo.

The arrival port at Mashabo.

As in most Amerindian communities, there is a village office , a special building where the Toshao and his council members meet to discuss important matters regarding the community.

As in most Amerindian communities, there is a village office , a special building where the Toshao and his council members meet to discuss important matters regarding the community.

The community is home to several church's . Here the Assemblies of God usually meet at this facility which is quite noticeable as one enter;s the village.

The community is home to several church’s . Here the Assemblies of God usually meet at this facility which is quite noticeable as one enter;s the village.

Cane juice making . We caught up with these villagers squeezing cane juice which will be used as an additive to the Piwari drink. The apparatus is simple to use , one of the boys noted.

Cane juice making . We caught up with these villagers squeezing cane juice which will be used as an additive to the Piwari drink. The apparatus is simple to use , one of the boys noted.

We were offered a cool drink of coconut water,picked minutes earlier by this expert in climbing .

We were offered a cool drink of coconut water,picked minutes earlier by this expert in climbing .

These lads appeared camera shy as we approached this concrete bridge ,which links one section of the community to another. The bridge was built through funding provided by a Connecticut -based entity in the United States.

These lads appeared camera shy as we approached this concrete bridge ,which links one section of the community to another. The bridge was built through funding provided by a Connecticut -based entity in the United States.

The community center stands in the white sand.

The community center stands in the white sand.

Our tour guide , Uncle Aaron , guides us down to the lake via one of several entrances along a 1-mile stretch on the banks of the waterway.

Our tour guide , Uncle Aaron , guides us down to the lake via one of several entrances along a 1-mile stretch on the banks of the waterway.

Lake 34

Another view of the lake

Breathtaking views of the lake , from the hill side.

Breathtaking views of the lake , from the hill side.

We found this retired canoe ,washed up at a corner of the lake.

We found this retired canoe ,washed up at a corner of the lake.

Uncle Aaron gives us a close-up shot. He said that he was born in the Supenaam area but moved to Mashabo when was was 7 years old. This week , he celebrates his 78th birthday , and at his age he is quite fit, as he walked the mile-long stretch of our tour.

Uncle Aaron gives us a close-up shot. He said that he was born in the Supenaam area but moved to Mashabo when was was 7 years old. This week , he celebrates his 78th birthday , and at his age he is quite fit, as he walked the mile-long stretch of our tour.

We happened upon a father and son moment as we scoured the area for more views of the water.

We happened upon a father and son moment as we scoured the area for more views of the water.

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Comments

  • De castro  On October 12, 2015 at 4:49 am

    Wow WOW ! real people from a real village in an area of natural beauty.
    A must see on my next Guyana trip……freshwater lake is interesting….
    Water source and water exit of my interest…..obviously the AQUA FIR may not be visible but am sure it exists.

    Will now Google mashabo or itiribisi for more info.

    Isn’t life simple l😇

  • Ron Persaud  On October 12, 2015 at 6:27 am

    I took a group of overseas visitors on the single occasion that I myself saw the lake. We had a very good time; and I was glad that my mind was distracted by the enjoyable activities that filled the day.
    Because it recalled the sad memory of Mr.(Francis) Yhip who drowned in the lake some years before, during the August holidays.
    Mr. Yhip was a young school teacher at Carmel R.C. School. He was talented. He built a delightful scale model of the school; and did chalkboard illustrations, in color, of things like the human digestive system and the germination of a seed. Miss Rhodie wrote a stirring memorial in that year’s annual school magazine.
    He was an excellent role model for the impressionable youth of that environment at that time.
    Some years later the tragedy was almost replicated when Patrick Lucas drowned, at a different location, during a school outing. A cake-shop along Durban street was named for him. Patrick Lucas was a leading figure in the St. Vincent DePaul Society at ‘Saints’. The modest chapter always got a great ovation at the Society’s Annual Conference. The group helped truants in the Primary School System, return to school.

    • albert  On October 12, 2015 at 10:14 am

      I was looking at the place as a must see before I die. Now you scare me with those drowning. Did those guys knew how to swim, or some other unknown pull them under?

    • Malcolm  On October 12, 2015 at 10:16 am

      I remember Francis Yhip. I also attended Carmel and lived on Howes Street.
      Everyone I knew loved Francis and we were saddened to learn of his death when we returned to school after the holidays. I suspect that occurred over 65 years ago.

  • Ron Persaud  On October 12, 2015 at 4:33 pm

    So, are you the Malcolm Singh who got a prize for reading when we were in first standard?

    • Malcolm  On October 12, 2015 at 4:54 pm

      Sorry I do not recall receiving this prize but to the best of my knowledge I was the only one with that name at Carmel. However I should check with my friend Gerry Moonsammy he is very good at remembering these details..

  • Clyde Duncan  On October 12, 2015 at 5:13 pm

    This is 2015 – it should not be a major challenge to organize some life jackets and an inflatable raft, or bamboo raft to keep an eye out for the safety of the swimmers. Guyana – the land of many waters.

  • Ron Persaud  On October 12, 2015 at 6:17 pm

    Back in those days every youth knew how to swim; as long as there was a middle-walk (punt trench) or side-line (forty feet) nearby. The swimming aid of popular choice was “mocko-mocko” – http://www.tropilab.com/mokomoko.html

  • LAVINA Edwards  On February 22, 2018 at 10:04 am

    This is my beautiful country. I certainly intended to travel to this place and more

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