Daily Archives: November 9, 2014

A Dutch Tomb, A Haunted House etc – By Ralph Seeram

From the Diaspora…A DUTCH TOMB, A HAUNTED HOUSE AND OTHER TID BITS FROM MY VISIT TO GUYANA

November 9, 2014 | By By Ralph Seeram

One of the things I enjoy when I visit Guyana is to go to the “rum shop” with my friends. In a “rum shop” (some folks call it a bar these days), men and women drink, lips get loose and story does come out. I go for the wild meat and the gossip.

There you hear who is sleeping with whose wife; which man is getting “blow”, which woman is giving “blow” and it goes on. You will also hear which government official “does beat dem wife,” and trying fuh “knack” young girls in exchange for jobs.

By the way, I had forgotten that the term “knock” or “knack’ in Guyanese parlance had a sexual connotation. I had not heard that term for the longest while, until the pimping Attorney General reminded me.   Continue reading

SCHOOL DAYS FAREWELL – By Dmitri Allicock

school days

SCHOOL DAYS FAREWELL

By Dmitri Allicock

River boat trip to a time and place

Song of youth and smiling face

Way up Demerara we must pass

Blossoms of innocence will last

School days of uniform and slate

Rule days of cane, don’t be late

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“Jungle Rot and Open Arms” – Poem by Janice Mirikitani

Three Worlds One Vision

070711-D-7203T-004Wounded War Veteran with wife at the Walter Reed Medical Center
Photo Credit: Cherie A. Thurlby / National Military Family Association

November 11 is Veterans Day. It’s an official American holiday to honor the men and women who have served in the U.S. Armed Forces. The date marks the anniversary of the end of World War I on November 11, 1918.

To commemorate this day, my Poetry Corner November 2014 features the poem “Jungle Rot and Open Arms” by Janice Mirikitani, a sansei or third-generation Japanese American born in 1941 in Stockton, California.

Janice Mirikitani’s life was touched by two wars: World War II and the Vietnam War. As an infant during World War II, she was interned with her family and other Japanese American families in the Rohwer Relocation Center in Arkansas.

At the end of the war, to avoid the racism still prevailing on the West Coast, Mirikitani’s…

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