Daily Archives: May 1, 2014

50 of the Best Uses for Coconut Oil

50 of the Best Uses for Coconut Oil

coconut_oil_imageCoconut oil has a bit of a craze surrounding it lately.

People have put together hundreds of different uses for this beneficial oil and it’s found its way into pantries, medicine cupboards, and even first aid kits. Some of the uses may seem bizarre at first, but coconut oil has garnered this newfound fame for good reason. It works.

For years, coconut oil has had a bad name, lumped in with unhealthy saturated fats. People steered away from it and other high fat foods. The problem with throwing coconut oil in the same category as butter, margarine, and shortening is this oil is far healthier than it appears. The saturated fats in coconut oil come from medium chain triglycerides. These shorter fat chains are easily put to use by the body and are not simply stored away as fat.  Continue reading

Gender, Ethnicity and Place: Women and Identities in Guyana

Gender, Ethnicity and Place: Women and Identities in Guyana – (Routledge Studies in Development and Society)

Book cover Gender, Ethnicity and Place: Women and Identities in Guyana (Routledge Studies in Development and Society)Linda Peake and D. Alissa Trotz

This book is concerned with the nature of the relationship between gender, ethnicity and poverty in the context of the external and internal dynamics of households in Guyana.

Using detailed data collected from male and female respondents in three separate locations, two urban and one rural, and across two major ethnic groups, Afro-Guyanese and Indo-Guyanese, the authors discuss the links between gender and race, exploring development issues from a feminist perspective.

Read complete study: [Linda_Peake – Alissa Trotz]_Gender,_Ethnicity_and_Place_Women_- Guyana

Hindu Communities in Mauritius, Guyana, Trinidad, South Africa, Fiji, and East Africa

New Homelands: Hindu Communities in Mauritius, Guyana, Trinidad, South Africa, Fiji, and East Africa

Book  305 pages – By Paul Younger
Book cover New Homelands: Hindu Communities in Mauritius, Guyana, Trinidad, South Africa, Fiji, and East Africa

When the colonial slave trade, and then slavery itself, were abolished early in the 19th century, the British empire brazenly set up a new system of trade using Indian rather than African laborers. The new system of “indentured” labor was supposed to be different from slavery because the indenture, or contract, was written for an initial period of five years and involved fixed wages and some specified conditions of work.
From the workers’ point of view, the one redeeming feature of the system was that most of their workmates spoke their language and came from the same area of India. Because this allowed them to develop some sense of community, by the end of the initial five years most of the Indian laborers chose to stay in the land to which they had been taken. In time that land became the place in which they joined with others to build a new homeland.
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