A Don Mills Subway for Toronto – commentary

A Don Mills Subway for Toronto -commentary

A proposal for improving transit in a city that desperately needs it.

BY 

don-mills-subway-alignment-150x150Toronto should have a subway line that runs from Front and Spadina to Eglinton and Don Mills. Formerly known as the “Downtown Relief Line,” it should instead be called the “Don Mills Subway,” and there should be no pretensions about it being some sort of self-indulgent present for downtown—nor about it stopping at Danforth.

In the map above is a proposal for what, roughly, this Don Mills Subway might look like.

Drawing subway lines on maps, especially for the DRL, has been a cottage industry among transit advocates and city watchers for several years, and everyone has their preferences. This proposed alignment is not intended to be definitive (although parts of it are locked down to allow for specific connections to existing infrastructure, and to take into account physical constraints on the route’s placement). Other alignments would be possible in places. The goal here is not to delve into that discussion in excruciating detail, but to show, through its key elements, what a new line could achieve.  [Read more]

 

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Comments

  • Clyde Duncan  On 11/30/2013 at 3:55 pm

    I skedaddle out of that place [Hog Town] about 40-years ago, when we could still drive a car around the place – price of a new car about $ 2,000-dollars and gasoline about $ 0.50-cents a gallon. I visit annually, only because I got people that I love there. They call that area the Don Valley Parking-Lot, for a reason. I read all the comments – I guess they are having a hard time. In May 2013, the DVP was flooded and I was chastised by my cousin for sharing some humour about that tragedy. Unbeknownst to me, his daughter had her car submerged in that muck. It was a bad scene! I would be concerned about a subway in that area, though. They may have to plant pylons along the route and install the rail-line above ground, say, a 100-feet high, or so?

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