Daily Archives: March 4, 2012

Flood Control – 02: Flood control in the Netherlands – videos

Editor’s Note:  Flood Control- 02

Guyanese Online will be featuring a number of articles and videos on flood and sea defence management.  The Dutch (Netherlands) are the most experienced in this technology, as three-quarters of their country is below sea level. They built the framework of Guyana’s drainage systems, as colonial rulers from 1581-1781. This is the second of many articles and videos that will be featured:

Flood control in the Netherlands

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Flood control is an important issue for the Netherlands, as about two thirds of its area is vulnerable to flooding, while the country is among the most densely populated on Earth. Natural sand dunes and man-made dikes, dams and floodgates provide defense against storm surges from the sea. River dikes prevent flooding from water flowing into the country by the major rivers Rhine and Meuse, while a complicated system of drainage ditches, canals and pumping stations(historically: windmills) keep the low lying parts dry for habitation and agriculture. Water control boards are the independent local government bodies responsible for maintaining this system.

In modern times, flood disasters coupled with technological development have led to large construction works to reduce the influence of the sea and prevent future floods.  [more]

Dutch Water Defence 1 / 2

Dutch Water Defence 2 / 2

— Post #1169

Flood Control – 01: The polder systems in The Netherlands

Editor’s Note:  Flood Control- 01

In 2005, I published an article Guyana Flood Analysis – Cyril Bryan, where I advocated the use of Dutch engineers and technology to solve Guyana’s recurring flood and sea defence problems. Garbage in canals is an issue, however, the main problem is that the present drainage infrastructure is inadequate.

Guyanese Online will be featuring a number of articles and videos on flood and sea defence management.  The Dutch (Netherlands) are the most experienced in this technology, as three-quarters of their country is below sea level. They built the framework of Guyana’s drainage systems, as colonial rulers from 1581-1781. This is the first of many articles and videos that will be featured:

The remarkable history of polder systems in The Netherlands

Summary

The traditional polders in The Netherlands have been formed from the 12th century onwards, when people started creating arable land by draining delta swamps into nearby rivers. In the process, the drained peat started oxidizing, thus soil levels lowered, up to river water levels and lower. Throughout the centuries farmers have been adapting their agricultural system to lowering soil levels and occasional floods and invented new ways to organise themselves and keep sea and river water out – resulting in the building of hundreds of drainage windmills and later pumping stations to pump water from polders into the rivers and the sea. Continue reading

Georgetown flood – Commentary

Georgetown flood – Commentary

By Stabroek News – March 4, 2012 – Editorial |  Comments

As Georgetowners sloshed around in the water last Wednesday, they must have wondered whether it might be worth investing in a wooden boat and paddles, rather than a Toyota or a Hyundai, given that flooding is becoming such a regular feature of existence. With the possible exception of Dhaka in Bangladesh, there can be no other capital city in the world whose thoroughfares and bottom houses disappear below the water level with such expedition after merely a day’s rain. It is true that as Mayor Green reported, 5.5 inches of rain fell in a 24-hour period, but then we have been experiencing the effects of La Niña, a phenomenon to which this country is hardly a stranger.

After the catastrophe of 2005, one might have thought that the authorities would have committed themselves to doing the things which would keep the city – which after all is the centre of government and commerce – largely high and dry, but apparently not. Of course, no one is suggesting that we can eliminate flooding altogether; however, its frequency could surely be reduced as could the severity of its impact. Continue reading

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