Daily Archives: 09/19/2010

Leadership and Vision – by Bill King

Guyanese born Bill King is the founder and Principal of the Nova Organizational Development Group (Nova Group Ltd.), a Management and Human Resources consulting company.  A graduate of the Harvard School of Business, he has a Bachelor of Arts Degree as well as a Certificate in Personnel and Industrial Relations from the University of Toronto. He could be contacted at bill.king@telus.net

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LEADERSHIP AND VISION – BY BILL KING

The world will stand aside for those with a compelling vision and a convincing plan for how to get there.

Vision – or a picture of a future state that we are pursuing – is one of the most powerful tools in a leader’s toolkit. Far from being just consultant-speak, Vision is what moves us all forward – improving, adapting, progressing, in a world constantly in flux.
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Vision as Dialogue
Imagine the next time there was an election that the political leaders actually engaged the public in dialogue about substantive issues. Far-reaching, high-impact issues such as: access to a reliable supply of fresh water; how the country would ensure the workforce could provide high-value services/products to the rest of the world; how we might ensure our elders are both listened to and cared for; how we can simultaneously sustain economic development and the environment upon which it de-pends; and how we might contribute to the safety, security and sustain-ability of the people.
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Imagine the next Board/CEO of your organization engaging employees, suppliers and other stakeholders about the substantive issues lying below the surface of most motivation “talk”.
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How will we generate enhanced value or improved cost/productivity with a 10 year-old production or IT system? How can we sustain high quality programs/services delivery into the future when 30% of our workforce is due to retire in the next few years and there are no upcom-ing/incoming people with their knowledge and experience in sight?
Sometimes today, I think leaders are too busy being “careful” and avoid-ing the difficult discussions, to truly be Visionary. Instead, let’s get our people and community focused on both the outcomes we aspire to achieve, and the real challenges that lie in our way. .

The world will stand aside for those with a compelling vision and a convincing plan for how to get there.Vision – or a picture of a future state that we are pursuing – is one of the most powerful tools in a leader’s toolkit. Far from being just consultant-speak, Vision is what moves us all forward – improving, adapting, pro-gressing, in a world constantly in flux.Vision as DialogueImagine the next time there was an election that the political leaders actually engaged the public in dialogue about substantive issues. Far-reaching, high-impact issues such as: access to a reliable supply of fresh water; how the country would ensure the workforce could provide high-value services/products to the rest of the world; how we might ensure our elders are both listened to and cared for; how we can simultaneously sustain economic development and the environment upon which it de-pends; and how we might contribute to the safety, security and sustain-ability of the people..Imagine the next Board/CEO of your organization engaging employees, suppliers and other stakeholders about the substantive issues lying below the surface of most motivation “talk”.How will we generate enhanced value or improved cost/productivity with a 10 year-old production or IT system? How can we sustain high quality programs/services delivery into the future when 30% of our workforce is due to retire in the next few years and there are no upcom-ing/incoming people with their knowledge and experience in sight?Sometimes today, I think leaders are too busy being “careful” and avoid-ing the difficult discussions, to truly be Visionary. Instead, let’s get our people and community focused on both the outcomes we aspire to achieve, and the real challenges that lie in our way. .

Read Full article: Guyanese Online – May 2010 – Bill King – Leadership and Vision

The Arrival of the Chinese in British Guiana

The Arrival of the Chinese in British Guiana

This article was published in the May 2010 edition of the Guyanese Online Newsletter.

Even though the planters in Guyana had expressed interest in introducing Chinese labourers since Emancipation, it was not until 1851 that such recruitment first began.

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Because of the long travel distance from China, at first Chinese were not recruited since it was cheaper to transport Indians. While it cost a planter 13 British pounds to transport an Indian labourer from Calcutta or Ma-dras, the cost was 15 pounds to transport a Chinese immigrant from any of the Chinese ports. But because of the growing need for labourers for the sugar estates, some planters decided to recruit Chinese especially during the period between 1848 and 1851 when Indian immigration was suspended.   Continue reading

Guyanese Cuisine – “Tastes Like Home”

Guyanese Cuisine – “Tastes Like Home”

This entry by Cynthia Nelson was published in the May 2010 edition of the Guyanese Online Newsletter

Hello!!   Welcome to Tastes Like Home, my virtual din-ing table! I’m Cynthia.
I was born and raised in the only English-speaking country in South America – Guyana. Guyana is a multi-cultural society and you will see that reflected in the food I make. Guyanese trace their heritage to every corner of the world, but especially Africa, India, China, Portugal, and to the indigenous popu-lations for whom the region has always been home.
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I’ve been living in Barbados now for more than a decade and so when I speak of home these days, I do not only refer to Guyana as home but also Barbados as both places contribute in different and significant ways to who I am.
I am a trained media practitioner and teach Broadcast Journalism. As a food writer, I write a weekly newspaper column, Tastes Like Home which is published in print and online at Guyana’s leading newspaper, http://www.stabroeknews.com/.
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Apart from my column, I also write freelance for a variety of publica-tions regionally and internationally. I am a regular contributor to Carib-bean Belle (Trinidad) and City Style & Living (Canada). I also Contrib-ute to U Magazine (a new Health Magazine produced and published in Trinidad & Tobago.
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